Comment history

banker says...

All you have to do is listen to KB's song "Civil Servant". It tells it all.

banker says...

It's not a disease. It is the way that they are made. If you think it is a disease, do what Jesus would do -- help the sick, not condemn them.

banker says...

And that is why we have religion.

banker says...

The Bahamian bloodlines een no prize. The gene pool needs a little chlorine. Bahamian women are 8 time more likely to either carry or express the breast cancer gene. The probability of consanguinity between any Bahamian person within the last three generations is 50%. My colleague at the bank (in Nassau) married a man of Haitian ancestry to prevent gene mutation and inbreeding. With the high percentage of Bahamian women having children by multiple men, the genetics is so inbred that we really need new genetic material for future generations to prevent expression of negative genetic traits.

On Investment fears on work visa plan

Posted 20 April 2019, 11:18 a.m. Suggest removal

banker says...

.....

banker says...

LOL -- multi-billion industry. The US registered 250,000 aircraft in 2017. To register an aircraft in the US (including jets) is a $5 entry free and a 3-year additional fee of $5. So how is this going to be multi-billion industry? Jokes.

banker says...

As a country that relies on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), we keep inventing ways to make it difficult for investors. For example, the government is/has passed an H1-B visa programme for skilled help in the Grand Bahama Tech Hub. Suppose a company hires 200 people under the visa plan, rents, builds or buys a building, creates an IT infrastructure, and seven years later, it has to send away its work-force for a year. My god, the country is run by retards. Where is common sense?

On Investment fears on work visa plan

Posted 19 April 2019, 3:34 p.m. Suggest removal

banker says...

The gene pool needs a little chlorine.

I agree with Coulson. There will be a huge economic impact of doubling the population. Bigger domestic markets, larger pool of capital for businesses to exploit, new fresh ideas and fresh businesses, better infrastructure, forward thinkers, a more global outlook -- everything good from diversity of opinions, culture, business and way of doing things. We currently have a low grade of human capital and legal immigration would help that.

But it will never happen for two reasons. (1) Bahamians are not enlightened enough, and that goes for the Prime Minister on down to the guy who sleeps against the stone wall on Balls Alley and eats coconuts to survive. (2) Due to global warming, most of the Bahamas will be under water in 30 year and a lot of the land mass will be submerged.

banker says...

If it fits ....

banker says...

Sigh. We are not competitive. The ease of doing business is horrendous. The reputation of The Bahamas is in tatters because the regulator allowed the likes of Julian Brown, Benchmark, Montaque, Owen Bethel and a host of others to flout the rules and steal client money Our regulators are at the least, inept, and at the most, corrupt. And this digital legislation crap that is being parroted by everyone is crap. How is a new law going to increase business? Once again, I point out that Cayman is without a law and its digital business is thriving. The profound idiocy of these statements are an embarrassment to right-minded Bahamians. It is very Trump-like. Say something false and hope that people will believe you. And the dummies among us do.

These people who make these pronouncements are part of the problem and not the solution. Ten years ago, Brian Moree wrote a report to allow foreign fintech professionals to come in and revamp the system and he was almost crucified. These people wouldn't know disruption if it slapped them up one side of the head and down the other. To say that The Bahamas has a lot going for us, is stupid and inane. We don't, otherwise we would be thriving.

Our infrastructure is bad. Our closed shop for lawyers and accountants is a major issue. Our reputation is in tatters because of corruption, both politically and in the regulatory sphere. We don't prosecute our white collar crimes. As long as we see one iota of a crumb of money falling off some rich man's table, we are willing to sell our grandmothers, our patriotism, our ethics and our soul to get that miserly crumb.

We are a corrupt nation of liars and and grifters with no moral compass. The rule of the law is severe for poor people and non-existent for the upper classes. And until that changes, we are doomed to slide lower and lower.